[Fox Business] Hyundai, Kia recalling 92K vehicles over fire risk

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Hyundai and Kia are recalling nearly 92,000 vehicles over concerns that an oil pump assembly can overheat and cause fires. 

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration says the affected vehicles include certain 2023 Hyundai Elantra, Kona, Palisade, Sonata, Tucson and 2024 Palisade models, as well as some 2023 Kia Seltos, Soul, Sportage and 2024 Seltos models. 

“The electronic controller for the Idle Stop & Go oil pump assembly may contain damaged electrical components that can cause the pump to overheat,” the NHTSA said in documents posted online. “An electric oil pump assembly that overheats increases the risk of a vehicle fire.” 

The documents urge owners to “park outside and away from structures until the recall repair is complete.” 

SAFETY AGENCY REPORTS POWER PROBLEMS IN HYUNDAI IONIQ 5 SUVs 

Hyundai owners are expected to be notified starting Sept. 25, while Kia owners will start receiving letters about the recalls three days later. 

Kia says it has six reports of melting components but no fires or injuries. Hyundai says it has confirmed four “thermal incidents” and no injuries. 

The Korean automakers say a capacitor on a circuit board in the oil pump assembly for the transmission may have been damaged by the supplier during manufacturing.

CALIFORNIA AGENCY INVESTIGATING PRIVACY POLICIES OF AUTO MANUFACTURERS 

Fox Business previously reported in June that a series of complaints raised safety concerns about Hyundai’s popular electric SUV. 

U.S. owners of the Ioniq 5 electric SUV have complained of completely or partially losing propulsive power, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. 

Many have said the loss of power came after hearing a loud popping noise. 

Hyundai said it would offer a software update beginning in July and replace affected components if necessary. 

The NHTSA said it received 30 complaints about the problem in 2022 models, of which it estimated 39,500 were on U.S. highways, according to a notice posted online. 

A preliminary investigation opened by a division within the NHTSA indicated a recharging issue. 

The issue is a power surge that damages transistors, preventing the SUV’s 12-volt battery from recharging. 

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Hyundai spokesperson Ira Gabriel has told Fox Business that the company was fully cooperating with the investigation and was launching a service campaign in July to update affected vehicles’ software. 

Fox Business’ Ken Martin and the Associated Press contributed to this report. 

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