[Fox Business] Public spaces are gold for hackers; here’s how to protect your data

Read Time:3 Minute, 30 Second

As more people are working remotely and embracing the digital nomad lifestyle and more concerts and sporting events are taking place this summer, some may not be taking precautions to protect their data in public spaces.

Concerts and sporting events are both environments where people need to be particularly mindful. Actions are relatively simple to employ, including updating software on your phone and refraining from clicking on suspicious emails.

New data from Microsoft released Wednesday takes a broader look at the increased cybersecurity risk posed by large-scale events and how companies and fans can protect their data. 

These tips can be useful for people to incorporate into their day-to-day data conduct in public places and beyond.

VERIZON WARNS CYBERSECURITY ATTACKS ARE ‘STILL ALIVE AND WELL’ IN LATEST DATA BREACH REPORT

What should people know about the increased cybersecurity risks that large-scale events pose? 

Live, large-scale events are packed with vulnerabilities, says Vasu Jakkal, Microsoft’s corporate vice president of security, compliance, identity and privacy.

“The influx of people, vendors and partners accessing online information simultaneously creates a myriad of opportunities for hackers,” Jakkal told FOX Business.

This could include the classic “hotspot honeypot.”

“Picture this: You’re at a game or concert, but you can’t get a proper cell signal, and all Wi-Fi networks require a password – except one. If that network was provided by a hacker, they’ll be able to monitor your phone activity,” she added. 

CHINA ‘PREPPING THE BATTLEFIELD’ AFTER MICROSOFT WARNS OF CYBERATTACKS ON U.S. INFRASTRUCTURE: EXPERT

Similarly, QR codes may also pose a threat.

“You may see a poster, sticker or flyer advertising a QR code with additional information about the home team,” she says. “Don’t forget to check if the poster has been altered. Cybercriminals have been known to paste new QR codes on top of the original, thereby leading you to a malicious site.”

What can people do to keep their data safe at events?

Jakkal provided some tips to better protect data:

1) Update your phone with the latest security software

“Time to install that security update you’ve ignored for the last three weeks. Don’t forget your laptop, tablet and any other mobile devices you’re traveling with,” she advised.

2) Exercise caution on Wi-Fi networks

“Your phone could be connecting to the Wi-Fi network automatically; adjust your mobile device settings to disable automatic connections,” she recommended.

GET FOX BUSINESS ON THE GO BY CLICKING HERE

3) Only connect to the Wi-Fi network provided by the venue

“Hackers often set up Wi-Fi networks intended to lure you in under the guise of safety,” Jakkal adds.

4) Avoid accessing sensitive information while connected to public Wi-Fi networks

Text your friends, but don’t access your bank account, she suggests.

How do you know if you are hacked?

Although it can be difficult to know if you’ve been hacked, there are a few signals to watch out for, Jakkal says.

1) According to Jakkal, your device’s operating system might appear that it is being manipulated by someone else.

“This could look like various apps, folders or links opening without your prompt and general slowness of the system,” she said.

READ MORE FROM FOX BUSINESS

2) If your bank account information was compromised, Jakkal tells FOX Business you could see unfamiliar transactions on bank statements or receive a notification that someone has logged into your bank account. Beware of text messages asking you to click on a link to “verify” a purchase, she warned.

3) If your social media account logins were compromised, you might see unfamiliar activity on your accounts that include posts that you didn’t make, she said.

“Cybercriminals who successfully accessed your name and email at an event may use it for email phishing (asking you to click on compromised links) to pay for a bill, for example,” adds Jakkal.

4) If you are noticing suspicious activity, start by changing your passwords on email, banking sites, social media platforms and your email account. Jakkal stresses using unique passwords for each. She also recommends updating your device and web browser with the latest security fixes.

Read More 

About Post Author

Happy
Happy
0 %
Sad
Sad
0 %
Excited
Excited
0 %
Sleepy
Sleepy
0 %
Angry
Angry
0 %
Surprise
Surprise
0 %