People Who Know How the News Is Made Resist Conspiratorial Thinking
Posted by BeauHD on 28th December 2017
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An anonymous reader quotes a report from Ars Technica: Conspiracy theories, like the world being flat or the Moon landings faked, have proven notoriously difficult to stomp out. Add a partisan twist to the issue, and the challenge becomes even harder. Even near the end of his second term, barely a quarter of Republicans were willing to state that President Obama was born in the U.S. If we’re seeking to have an informed electorate, then this poses a bit of a problem. But a recent study suggests a very simple solution helps limit the appeal of conspiracy theories: news media literacy. This isn’t knowledge of the news, per se, but knowledge of the companies and processes that help create the news. While the study doesn’t identify how the two are connected, its authors suggest that an understanding of the media landscape helps foster a healthy skepticism.

[…] “Despite popular conceptions,” the authors point out, “[conspiratorial thinking] is not the sole province of the proverbial nut-job.” When mixed in with the sort of motivated reasoning that ideology can, well, motivate, crazed ideas can become relatively mainstream. Witness the number of polls that indicated the majority of Republicans thought Obama wasn’t born in the U.S., even after he shared his birth certificate. While something that induces a healthy skepticism of information sources might be expected to help with this, it’s certainly not guaranteed, as motivated reasoning has been shown to be capable of overriding education and knowledge on relevant topics.

[…] As a whole, the expected connection held up: “for both conservatives and liberals, more knowledge of the news media system related to decreased endorsement of liberal conspiracies.” And, conversely, the people who did agree with conspiracy theories tended to know very little about how the news media operated.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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