[Fox News] Emojis for dummies: How to add emojis into your text messages, emails

Emojis can be a fun and lighthearted way to add some “emotion” to your text messages or emails. Emojis have come a long way; back in the day, all you could really do was send a smiley face, sad face or winky face by using colons, semicolons and parentheses. Now, you can send all sorts of emojis, not just faces, but images of foods, objects, landmarks, you name it, to liven up your message.

But how do you add them? Though some devices and platforms make it easy to add emojis to messages, this isn’t the case across the board. What was meant to be a fun addition to your texting experience is now becoming a frustration.

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Adding emojis in text messages is relatively easy. Just open up your SMS messaging app, and at the bottom of the conversation where you input your text, look out for a smiley face icon. When you click on it, you’ll see the option for Emoji, stickers and GIFs. Click on “Emoji” and browse the long list of them.

You can scroll all the way down to find which Emoji you want or click on the different icons that symbolize separate categories. You can also search for what you’re looking for in the “Search Emoji” box.

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Adding emojis to a subject line is not as straightforward as adding them to an email. You’ll need to first insert the emoji you want into the body of the email or copy it from an emoji website. Then, highlight the emoji, copy it and paste it into the subject line. Doing so can draw attention to your email with a subject line that stands out.

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In total, there are 3,782 emojis in the Unicode Standard as of September 2023, according to Emojipedia. This website is also where you can find the complete index of all the emojis that exist. Here are some additional key emoji statistics for 2024:

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Adding emojis to your text messages and emails is a fun way to lighten up the conversation and make it a little more relatable, depending on who you’re talking to. Have fun with them.

Do you use emojis when you text or send an email? Why or why not? Let us know by writing us at Cyberguy.com/Contact.

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[Fox News] Could Microsoft’s creepy ‘Recall’ AI feature become potent spy tool for crooks?

Microsoft has announced a change in the rollout plan for the Recall preview feature on Copilot+ PCs. Instead of a broad preview release on June 18, 2024, as initially planned, Recall will first be made available to the Windows Insider Program in the coming weeks. By gathering feedback from Insiders, Microsoft aims to refine the feature further before making it available to all Copilot+ PC users.

Microsoft recently announced the “Recall” feature for Copilot+ PCs, an AI tool capable of recording everything on your screen. Recall is designed to act as a personal “photographic memory,” capturing periodic snapshots of your screen to create a visual timeline. It allows you to easily find and revisit content you’ve previously viewed across apps, websites, documents and more.

While the ability to instantly recall on-screen information could be incredibly useful, security researchers have exposed potential flaws that could expose personal data to malicious code. Maybe that’s why Microsoft, for the moment, is delaying its implementation in new computers being delivered this week.

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While Recall’s ability to surface past on-screen content could be incredibly useful, there are legitimate fears that the feature could become a potent spy tool and a potential “nightmare” if your device falls into the wrong hands.

Even if you use incognito mode or clear your browsing history, Recall still has full access to your entire on-screen history. Microsoft says the data never leaves your computer, but critics aren’t fully convinced.

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The AI-informed system regularly snapshots what you’re doing on screen and lets you search for important data you may have lost track of as you work. However, security experts who examined Recall’s operation closely concluded that the system could pose serious security risks.

Recall is built into what Microsoft is calling “Copilot+” PCs – the tech giant’s vision of how traditional computers will become AI-powered workhorses. When it launched, Microsoft explained that Recall wouldn’t capture certain private content like Netflix videos or incognito browser sessions but would see everything else. In theory, this broad visibility makes Recall more useful for resurfacing lost work.

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But security researcher Kevin Beaumont has already found very worrying flaws. In particular, the system stores data in a straightforward plain text system that malicious code could easily trawl through to find any personal data, from sensitive work files to private communications. He says the fear is that Recall makes it easier for malware and attackers to steal information. Beaumont admits Microsoft made some “smart decisions” around encryption, but he says they ultimately don’t work.

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He’s withholding full technical details for now to give Microsoft time to fix the loophole. But the potential for exposing everything from financial data to private health information is clear. Even if you trust Microsoft, bad actors could potentially find ingenious ways to exploit the tool’s treasure trove of data.

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Whether Microsoft can swiftly resolve Recall’s security gaps or not, the revelations highlight how new AI capabilities often raise new privacy minefields that need to be carefully navigated. Innovative features and robust data protection will need to go hand-in-hand as AI plays a bigger role on our devices. While the debate rages on about Recall’s potential privacy implications, there are some proactive steps you can take to protect your data and use the tool more securely.

First and foremost, Recall is an opt-in feature during the initial device setup. If you have reservations, simply decline to enable it. Your computer will function normally without this “time machine” capability.

If you do enable Recall, take advantage of the customization options to blacklist any apps, programs or websites you want to exclude from being recorded and indexed. This lets you pick and choose what Recall has access to.

One low-tech solution is to use dedicated devices for different purposes. Keep one computer for work, one for personal browsing and one for any ultrasensitive activities you want to completely wall off from Recall’s monitoring. As Recall evolves, look for guidance from Microsoft as adjusting your settings and adopting new privacy habits could become necessary.

In response to these privacy and security concerns, Microsoft has announced several updates to Recall:

Microsoft has also reinforced its commitment to security, stating that all Copilot+ PCs will be Secured-core PCs with advanced firmware safeguards, Microsoft Pluton security processor enabled by default, and Windows Hello Enhanced Sign-in Security for more secure biometric sign-ins.

Microsoft emphasizes that users will have control over what Recall captures and saves:

While Recall aims to provide a useful AI-powered experience, Microsoft acknowledges the importance of user trust and choice, positioning the preview as an opportunity to learn from real-world scenarios and refine the feature based on feedback.

Once the Recall preview is available in the Windows Insider Program, Microsoft will publish a blog post detailing how to access it. Participation in the Recall preview will require a Copilot+ PC due to hardware requirements.

After gathering feedback from the Insider community, Microsoft plans to make the Recall preview available to all Copilot+ PC users, incorporating insights and refinements based on real-world scenarios.

We reached out to Microsoft, and a company rep steered us toward the company’s website, where they have this statement posted: “We are on a journey to build products and experiences that live up to our company mission to empower people and organizations to achieve more, and are driven by the critical importance of maintaining our customers’ privacy, security and trust. As we always do, we will continue to listen to and learn from our customers, including consumers, developers and enterprises, to evolve our experiences in ways that are meaningful to them.”

Microsoft’s Recall AI is currently in preview status, and while it is undeniably useful, it is also undeniably concerning from a privacy perspective. Keeping all that rich data exclusively local is smart but probably not an ironclad guarantee against potential misuse down the road. As always, with new tech, users will decide if the convenience is worth the potential risks for their own situation. For some, Recall may be a dream; for others, it could be a nightmare. Regardless, the debate shows that we still have work to do in striking the right balance between innovation and privacy in the AI era.

How do you balance the benefits of innovative AI features like Recall with the need for personal data protection and privacy? Let us know by writing us at Cyberguy.com/Contact.

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[Fox News] Is this pint-sized electric vehicle about to be big disruptor in US?

You’ve probably never heard of Eli Electric Vehicles, but this little company is making big waves in the electric vehicle world. It just announced reservations are now open in the U.S. for its popular Eli Zero microcar.

So what’s the deal with these “microcars” anyway? 

They’re basically tiny EVs designed for zipping around cities. In Europe, they’re called quadricycles, and in the U.S. they fall under the low-speed vehicle (LSV) category.

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The Eli Zero has compact dimensions of 88.6 inches in length, 54.3 inches in width and 64.4 inches in height. It rides on 165/65 R13 tires with alloy rims. The wheelbase measures 63 inches, while the track width is 45.67 inches. It has a seating capacity for two occupants and offers 5.65 cubic feet of trunk space for storage.

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Despite its tiny size, the Eli Zero packs a pretty big punch. Thanks to its 8 kWh battery pack, it can go 60 miles on a single charge. And with a 3.2 kW onboard charger, you can top it up in just under three hours at a 240V station. Sure, it’s no speed demon, with a top speed of 25 mph. But it’s got all the amenities of a regular car, like A/C, keyless entry and even an optional Sony infotainment system. 

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With a footprint shorter than a Hummer EV is wide, you could literally park four of these things in one parallel spot. No more circling the block for parking. It’s the ultimate city car.

Eli’s CEO and founder, Marcus Li, tells CyberGuy that he sees the Eli Zero as a game-changer in urban mobility: “It’s about transforming urban trips and significantly improving city life by making transportation easier, cleaner and more efficient through micro-EVs that seamlessly integrate into our daily routines.”

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The Eli Zero prioritizes safety with features like four hydraulic electric-powered-assisted disc brakes, MacPherson front struts with an anti-roll bar, and an electronic parking brake. Safety belts with a seat belt reminder help ensure occupants are properly secured. A rearview camera and radar parking sensors aid visibility and make parking easier. A tow button allows the vehicle to be towed if needed. An acoustic vehicle alert system warns pedestrians of the Eli Zero’s presence at low speeds. Emergency alerts are also integrated for added safety.

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It’s a pretty niche market. Most new automakers in this space have struggled to sell more than a few dozen units. But the Eli Zero has already found success in Europe and French Polynesia, with hundreds cruising the streets (though I guess “hundreds” is still niche in the grand scheme of things).

Now Eli is bringing their pint-sized EV to the States, and you can reserve yours today for just $200 (fully refundable). At $11,990, the Eli Zero is pretty affordable, too. Deliveries are slated for Q3 2024, so you won’t have to wait too long if you get your order in.

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The US version has been upgraded to meet federal safety regulations for LSVs, making it street-legal to drive just like a regular car. Well, kind of; it’s limited to roads with speed limits up to 35 mph. But let’s be honest, that covers most city streets anyway.

The Eli Zero definitely seems to be filling an interesting niche in the EV market. While it may not be for everyone, it could be the perfect urban runabout for folks who don’t need to go far or fast. With its tiny size, zippy performance and car-like features, the Eli Zero makes running errands a breeze without the headache of parking a full-sized vehicle. And at less than $12,000, it’s pretty affordable, too. Eli says they have some innovative new features in the works for the U.S. launch, too. Who knows, this little microcar could be the next big thing in eco-friendly city mobility.

What do you think about microcars like the Eli Zero for city driving? Would you consider getting one as an affordable, eco-friendly option for running errands and short commutes around town? Or do the limitations like a 25 mph top speed and 35 mph road restriction make it impractical for your needs? Let us know by writing us at Cyberguy.com/Contact.

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